“Vampire Facelift” – Are the Claims Fact or Fiction?

This new procedure claims to fill in wrinkles and to plump up hollow cheeks, using a filler, Selphyl, mixed with the patients own blood. But does it work?

Recently there has been a great deal of talk surrounding a new procedure,  known by most as the “Vampire Facelift”. Stories in The New York Times, on The Doctors, and on CBS news have sparked interest in this new and controversial procedure. Many of my patients come to me for advice on the “latest” procedures that they read about in the papers or see on TV. Throughout my years of practice, I’ve prided myself on my conservative approach which leads to subtle, age appropriate results. I   Fad procedures may come and go, but as cosmetic surgeons we have a responsibility to be doctors first and foremost before we give in to the lure of lucrative retail. Patients must remain extra cautious and vigilant about new fads and procedures which don’t have a clear safety and efficacy record.

In my opinion, this treatment needs to be studied much better before being promoted as such, it has a certain invasiveness and potential for complications are high. And the results may be too modest at best to warrant such risk.In the current environment, patients must be aware that a “doctor” title does not guarantee good advice. And being featured  on television does not promise strong doctor credentials or ethical practice.

This is another clear example that retail and medicine don’t always mix well. Your skin, your wallet, or both could bleed!

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Dr. Nabavian